July 08, 2012

To govern is to choose

So the saying goes.

Liam Halligan continues to argue that the banking system is broken, and dangerous to the economy.

The Lords is a bit creaky, but not dangerous to anyone.

And yes, we all know which one the government has decided to try to reform.

This weak government scuttles away from the big problems such as the banks and our energy supply. As Booker points out today, the government prefers to shut its eyes to our impending energy crisis and the shale solution beneath our feet.

It's puzzling. Why would you work and plot to get into government if you are going to be too scared to tackle the big problems and opportunities facing your country?

By their choices shall ye know them.

5 comments:

Johnm said...

Because if you take-on the big problems you will not be in government for long ?

A K Haart said...

Reform the banking system or reform the Lords?

Just like kids at school, if it's a choice of double maths or games...

Weekend Yachtsman said...

Perhaps also because all authority on the big problem areas has been surrendered to the actual government in Brussels, leaving these clowns (a) with nothing to do and (b) afraid to admit why.

It would be funny if they weren't so good at dreaming up petty but annoying ways to interfere in our lives.

Edward Spalton said...

Until Mrs T, all Conservative governments ran away from the problem of over-mighty trade unions which, frequently combined with weak management, were a leading cause of industrial decline. The nub of the matter was the legal immunity for almost any action carried out during a "trade dispute". These were sacred "workers'rights" which could not be infringed.

To Labour's credit, they tried rather late in the day to deal with the problem with "In Place of Strife" but it was summarily dismissed by the Union barons.

Harold MacMillan certainly thought he would solve the problem by opening British industry to unrestricted competition within the EEC. This, he thought, would bring people to their senses and compel rational behaviour by the unions and the "wildcat" shop stewards' movement which actually saw saw its wrecking tactics as the vanguard of revolution.

By the time that reality broke in, it was too late for much of British industry.

James Higham said...

The Lords is a bit creaky, but not dangerous to anyone.

And yes, we all know which one the government has decided to try to reform.

In a nutshell. If there are two ways and one is right and one is wrong ...