June 21, 2012

Fracking shale gas & oil is not "controversial"

Let's see.
  • America's history of commercial production from shale dates back to the 1940s, when natural gas was first produced from the Antrim in Northern Michigan
     
  • The first recorded application of hydraulic fracturing technology took place in Kansas in 1947
     
  • Fracking technology has been safely applied to more than 1.2 million wells in the US over the past 65 years
     
  • The first patent for the commercial application of horizontal drilling was awarded in 1981
     
  • More than 450,000 natural gas wells are currently active in the US. Nearly all have been made viable thanks to the fracturing process
     
  • Hydraulic fracturing is also used to enhance flow from water wells and to stimulate the production of geothermal energy
     
  • Most US States require fracturing sites to be fully reclaimed and remediated 90 to 120 days after development concludes
     
  • In 18 months, producers in Pennsylvania went from recycling zero per cent of their waste water to more than 90% of it
     
  • On average, the process of completing a well via the fracturing process takes between 2 and 5 days
     
  • By 2015, shale will account for 43% of the US's natural gas supply, up from only 1% a decade ago
     
  • US consumers will save $113 billion on energy between now and 2015 thanks to shale, according to Federal Reserve Economists

3 comments:

James Higham said...

I don't see it as being any more harmful than other processes, including oil wells. What's the alternative? All have waste products or are pointless, e.g. wind farms.

Elby the Beserk said...

Add to that, using natural gas to replace coal has meant significant cuts in the emission of c02 in the USA.

If that sort of thing worries you (it doesn't worry me. I like CO2. My garden likes it too. Indeed, we are a carbon based life form on a carbon based planet. What's NOT to like about carbon, in all its many forms?)

John Page said...

Thanks. I completely agree with you both.